HAPPY VALENTINES DAY! A VARIETY OF DELICIOUS OFFERINGS GOING OUT FOR DELIVERY FRIDAY FEBRUARY 14TH

Greeting Fish Enthusiasts! Happy Valentine's Day! If you are looking to cook up a delicious, sustainable & local Valentine's Day dinner we have you covered! Add to your menu local Sablefish, Dungeness Crab, Grenadier, Black Trumpets, Yellowfoot & Hedgehog mushrooms. We also have sweet & aromatic Dried Candy Caps which are great for making a unique dessert. We will be making a delivery of these Valentine's Day delights on Friday, February 14th


If you're a package holder, please use the Prepaid Order Form

or head to our Online Store to purchase


Species: Sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) Catch Date: 02/12/2020 Boat: F/V Lethal Weapon Captain: Peter Nguyen Port: Moss Landing Catch Method: Bottom Set Line Monterey Bay Seafood Watch Rating: Best Choice Share Size: Full Share 1.25 lbs Half Share 0.65 lbs Fillets will be skin on with some small pin bones

Sablefish is commonly known as butterfish due to its soft texture, delicate flakes and rich buttery taste. These characteristics can be contributed to its high levels of healthy fatty acids. It has been consumed as a delicacy in Japan for many years and is now making its way onto the local market. Sablefish are found in muddy seabeds at depths of up to 9,000 feet and prefer the edge of the continental shelf. They are opportunistic hunters who like to feed on other fish, squid and even jellyfish. Sablefish mature early and have a long lifespan (up to 90 years).

Sablefish’s buttery, rich and flakey texture make it a great substitute for other impact fish, such as the Chilean Seabass. It is a very well managed fish with its population numbers well into the healthy range. When they are caught using fishing methods such as traps or bottom set lines, they have minimal bycatch and environmental impacts.


Cooked & Cleaned Dungeness Crab Species: Dungeness Crab (Metacarcinus magister) Catch Date: 02/11/2020 Boat: F/V Ruth Anne II Captain: Khevin Mellegers Port: Santa Cruz Catch Method: Trap Monterey Bay Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative Share Size: Full Share 1.40 lbs Crab will be Cooked & Cleaned

Dungeness Crab is a West Coast tradition with a fishery dating back to the late 1800’s. They have a unique life cycle that involves five different larvae stages before metamorphosing into mature crabs. The crabs molt annually allowing them to grow up to an inch during their molting season. Without an exoskeleton, they are left defenseless and can be found buried beneath the sand while waiting for their new shell to harden. Mating occurs immediately after molting with the male embracing the female for several days before mating begins. The female is able to carry 2.5 million eggs per season which she keeps safe by attaching them onto her body. When live, these crustaceans have a beautiful purple hue and are prized for the delicate, soft and mildly sweet flavor that is best appreciated fresh from the boat.

Dungeness Crab in California is considered a well-managed fishery with strict regulations that only allow crabs to be caught for a select number of months each year. Traps have minimal bycatch and negligible environmental damage. All females are freed and only males with carapaces greater than 5.75 inches can be retained. Relatively stable landings over the past 30 years suggest that the Dungeness Crab population is healthy, although no formal stock assessments have been made.


Species: Grenadier (Macrouridae) Catch Date: 02/12/2020 Boat: F/V Lethal Weapon Captain: Peter Nguyen Port: Moss Landing Catch Method: Bottom Set Line Monterey Bay Seafood Watch Rating: Best Choice Share Size: Full Share 1.50 lbs Fillets will be skin off with some small pin bones

The Pacific Grenadier is a deep dwelling fish that is normally caught as incidental bycatch when fishing for other deep sea species such and Sablefish and Blackgill Rockfish. They are a rather bizarre looking fish with big heads, large eyes and a slender body that tapers down to a thin tail, giving them their nickname “Rattail”. It is estimated that 240 tons of Grenadier are caught as bycatch each year and unfortunately they don’t have much demand on the market. These fish have a mild flavor with a flaky texture and are not too oily, making them a great choice for people with a more sensitive palate, such as children.

Monterey Bay Seafood Watch rates Grenadier as a Good Alternative due to their long lives, slow growth to maturity and limited knowledge about the species in general but minmal fishing pressure locally makes them a sustainable option. Grenadier is considered bycatch while targeting other species and currently there is no directed fishery for Grenadier on the west coast. Historically, Grenadier has gone unused, yet today it is making its way onto the market in unique ways that save this fish from otherwise being wasted.


Dried Candy Caps Species: Candy Caps (Lactarius rubidus) Harvest Date: Winter 2020 Forager: Lukas Vrana Location: Mendocino County Harvest Method: Hand Harvested Share Size: Full Share 1 oz

Candy Caps are found growing among Coast Live Oaks, Tan oak and Douglas Fir trees with who they share a mycorrhizal relationship. They can be found growing solitary or in loose clusters during Fall and Winter along the west coast of North America. The caps are lightly con-vexed becoming flattened and they have an overall vase shape that ranges from orange-brown to reddish-brown color that remains to the bottom of the stipe. They have an odor of maple syrup and sugar that becomes stronger when they are dried which is what gives them their name Candy Cap.


Species: Black Trumpets (Craterellus cornucopioides) Harvest Date: 02/10/2020 Forager: Lukas Vrana Location: Mendocino County Harvest Method: Hand Harvested Share Size: Full Share 1.0 lb Half Share 0.50 lbs

Black Trumpets can be found locally in mixed Tan Oak and Redwood Forests and fruit in late Fall through winter. They range from Santa Cruz County northward. Sometimes confused as Black Chanterelles, they're actually not closely related to each other. They have a rich and complex flavor a wonderfully fragrant smell and are a favorite of many local foragers and chefs. They can be very difficult to find due to their dark color and camouflaging abilities.


Species: Hedgehogs (Hydnum umbilicatum) Harvest Date: 02/10/2020 Forager: Lukas Vrana Location: Mendocino County Harvest Method: Hand Harvested Share Size: Full Share 1.0 lb Half Share 0.50 lbs

Hedgehog are found from the central coast of California up to British Columbia and have a mycorrhizal relationship with Live Oaks and sometimes conifers. This type of relationship benefits both the tree and the fungal as they exchange nutrients between the two of them They are among the few species of mushrooms that have a toothed hymenophore, as opposed to gills. Their caps have a soft peach color with a convexed and dented inner margin. Hedgehog’s have a unique earthy and nutty flavor with a mild peppery taste.


Species: Yellowfoot (Craterellus tubaeformis) Harvest Date: 02/10/2020 Forager: Lukas Vrana Location: Mendocino County Harvest Method: Hand Harvested Share Size: Full Share 1.0 lb Half Share 0.50 lbs

Yellowfoot mushrooms are a member of the Chanterelle family and have a mycorrhizal relationship with several species of conifer. They are found scattered on rotten conifer wood, moss and soil usually during the wet months of January and February, which gives them their nickname Winter Chanterelle. They have a trumpet-shaped flowering body that ranges in color from brown to saffron yellow. Their cap is convexed with wide-spaced gills becoming hollow in the center and tapering down to a long, thin stipe. They have a delicate and slightly fruity aroma with a soft, moist flesh.


If you're a package holder, please use the Prepaid Order Form

or head to our Online Store to purchase



Recipes


Mushroom Risotto with Pan-Seared Sablefish



Ingredients:

3 cups of chicken stock

1 pinch of saffron

2 tablespoons of tomato paste

2 cups of farro

0.5 - 1 lb of minced mushroom of your choice

1 shallot, minced

1 clove of garlic, minced

1/2 cup of dry white wines

alt and pepper

3 cups of chopped rainbow chard

1/4 cup of heavy cream

1/4 cup of fresh grated parmesan cheese

0.65 - 1.25 lbs of fresh black cod, divided into portions

Olive oil

2 tablespoons of butter

2 tablespoons of peanut oil


Procedure:

1. In a large stockpot, heat chicken stock, saffron and tomato paste; bring to a simmer

2. In a large pan, heat two tablespoons of olive oil, saute mince shallot and garlic until starting to brown, add minced mushrooms to sweat for a few minutes then add farro and saute for another 2-3 minutes

3. Add white wine and stir until absorbed

4. Add simmering stock 1/2 cup at a time stirring until absorbed between additionsWhen 80 percent of the stock has been added, stir in chopped rainbow chard until wiltedAdd remaining stock and stir until completely absorbed

5. Stir in heavy cream and parmesan cheese, season risotto with salt and pepper, keep warm over low heatIn a heavy bottomed pan, heat two tablespoons of peanut oil with 2 tablespoons of butter of medium high heat

6. When pan is almost smoking, add fish, skin side down; cook 3-4 minutes per side until cooked through and fish flakes easily

7. Serve fish immediately, over warm risotto


Candy Cap Mushroom Cookies


Ingredients:

1 cup dried candy cap mushrooms 1 cup butter, softened, plus extra for sauté 1 cup sugar 1 egg 1/2 tsp vanilla 2 1/2 cups flour, sifted 1/2 cup toasted pecans, chopped


Procedure:

1. Rehydrate dried mushrooms for 20 minutes in enough warm water to cover. Wring out excess liquid, pat dry with paper towel, chop, and sauté several minutes with a nob of butter over medium heat. Save stock for another use. 2. Cream together butter and sugar. Beat in egg and vanilla. Slowly add flour while stirring, then chopped nuts and sautéed candy caps.

3. Roll cookie dough into three logs, each about 1 1/2 inches in diameter. I use wax paper and a sushi roller. Wrap logs in wax paper and freeze. 4. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Slice cookies about 1/4 inch thick and place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 8 - 10 minutes until bottoms of cookies are golden brown.



If you have any questions feel free to email us

ocean2table@gmail.com or text us at (831) 295-8403

Thank you for supporting your local fishermen and fisherwomen!

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